Diplomacy in the Middle East the International Relations of Regional and Outside Powers pdf

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Diplomacy in the Middle East the International Relations of Regional and Outside Powers by L Carl Brown pdf free download

Diplomacy in the Middle East the International Relations of Regional and Outside Powers by L Carl Brown pdf free download. Soon after the publication of Diplomacy in the Middle East in 2001 an event occurred destined henceforth to be recognizable in numerical shorthand – 9/11. On September 11, 2001 Islamists belonging to a transnational terrorist organization, al-Qa’ida (the Base) commandeered four American commercial airplanes.

Diplomacy in the Middle East the International Relations of Regional and Outside Powers by L Carl Brown pdf

Two were crashed into and destroyed the twin skyscrapers of New York’s World Trade Center, one hit the Pentagon and the fourth, also apparently having Washington as its target, crashed in Pennsylvania after passengers overwhelmed the hijackers. The terrible deeds accomplished in those few morning hours of September 2001, attacking symbols of America’s economic and military global reach and slaughtering almost three thousand individuals, set in motion a response that produced the American-led overthrow of the radical fundamentalist Taliban government ruling in Afghanistan and the scattering, but not destroying, of the terrorist organization al-Qa’ida based there.

Diplomacy in the Middle East the International Relations of Regional and Outside Powers by L Carl Brown pdf

Set in motion, as well, was the American campaign to force Saddam Husayn from power in Iraq. The claim by the Bush administration that the US had the will and the right to impose regime change in a Middle Eastern country was based on a somewhat shiftingly presented roster of charges, including alleged Iraqi links to al-Qa’ida, but even more the assertion that Iraq, in violation of UN sanctions,
was working to produce weapons of mass destruction. President Bush proclaimed immediately after 9/11 that states supporting or harboring terrorists would be considered enemies of the US.

Diplomacy in the Middle East the International Relations of Regional and Outside Powers by L Carl Brown pdf

His January 2002 State of the Union address singled out two Middle Eastern states, Iraq and Iran, plus North Korea as constituting an “axis of evil”. General statements by him or by administration spokesmen advanced the bold foreign policy agenda of an America prepared to act preemptively against terrorist threats and to impose regime changes when the US deemed it necessary. Action accompanied these words, beginning with the quickly mustered military campaign that overthrew the Taliban in Afghanistan. This has been followed by the build-up of US forces in the Middle East for an attack against the Saddam Husayn regime in Iraq. All such steps were undergirded by a commitment to not just regional but global military predominance.

Diplomacy in the Middle East the International Relations of Regional and Outside Powers by L Carl Brown pdf

As the official “National Security Strategy of the United States of America”, released in September 2002, stated (p. 30), “Our forces will be strong enough to dissuade potential adversaries from pursuing a military build-up in hopes of surpassing, or equaling, the power of the United States.” In the Introduction (p. xii) to Diplomacy in the Middle East, written before 9/11, we asked if the post-Cold War world with a single superpower, the U.S., would radically change the multipolar contours of Middle Eastern diplomacy and we prudently
admitted that it is too soon to tell. What then of the US actions since 9/11? Certainly, these American actions – the doctrine of preemption and regime change in Afghanistan and Iraq – represent the boldest efforts to manage the Middle East ever advanced by an outside state.
Diplomacy in the Middle East the International Relations of Regional and Outside Powers by L Carl Brown pdf
This goes well beyond earlier US announcements and actions dating back to the 1947 Truman Doctrine committing the US to defend one part or another of the Middle East against outside aggression or even against internal forces supported by outsiders. In these earlier doctrines (including the 1957 Eisenhower Doctrine and the 1980 Carter Doctrine) the principle of the sovereign state was honored. Now, the Bush posture in its extreme form asserts an American right to decide unilaterally when regime change of a Middle Eastern state is necessary and to take military action if necessary to that end.
Diplomacy in the Middle East the International Relations of Regional and Outside Powers by L Carl Brown pdf
The Bush administration did back off from its most unilateralist posture by successfully challenging the UN Security Council to get the UN arms inspectors back in to Iraq (withdrawn in 1998) under terms much more stringent for Iraq, but a close reading of President Bush’s September 2002 speech to the UN and of later official statements indicates that the US reserved the right to act alone if necessary, which it has now done after failing to get a follow-up explicit green light from the Security Council.

Diplomacy in the Middle East the International Relations of Regional and Outside Powers by L Carl Brown pdf

Diplomacy in the Middle East the International Relations of Regional and Outside Powers by L. Carl Brown pdf


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